Securing cyberspace: Identifying key actors in hacker communities

Victor Benjamin, Hsinchun Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the computer becomes more ubiquitous throughout society, the security of networks and information technologies is a growing concern. Recent research has found hackers making use of social media platforms to form communities where sharing of knowledge and tools that enable cybercriminal activity is common. However, past studies often report only generalized community behaviors and do not scrutinize individual members; in particular, current research has yet to explore the mechanisms in which some hackers become key actors within their communities. Here we explore two major hacker communities from the United States and China in order to identify potential cues for determining key actors. The relationships between various hacker posting behaviors and reputation are observed through the use of ordinary least squares regression. Results suggest that the hackers who contribute to the cognitive advance of their community are generally considered the most reputable and trustworthy among their peers. Conversely, the tenure of hackers and their discussion quality were not significantly correlated with reputation. Results are consistent across both forums, indicating the presence of a common hacker culture that spans multiple geopolitical regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationISI 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics: Cyberspace, Border, and Immigration Securities
Pages24-29
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event2012 10th IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics, ISI 2012 - Washington, DC, United States
Duration: Jun 11 2012Jun 14 2012

Other

Other2012 10th IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics, ISI 2012
CountryUnited States
CityWashington, DC
Period6/11/126/14/12

Fingerprint

Information technology

Keywords

  • Cyber security
  • Cybercrime
  • Hacker
  • Hacker community
  • Key actor
  • Reputation
  • Social media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Information Systems

Cite this

Benjamin, V., & Chen, H. (2012). Securing cyberspace: Identifying key actors in hacker communities. In ISI 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics: Cyberspace, Border, and Immigration Securities (pp. 24-29). [6283296] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISI.2012.6283296

Securing cyberspace : Identifying key actors in hacker communities. / Benjamin, Victor; Chen, Hsinchun.

ISI 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics: Cyberspace, Border, and Immigration Securities. 2012. p. 24-29 6283296.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Benjamin, V & Chen, H 2012, Securing cyberspace: Identifying key actors in hacker communities. in ISI 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics: Cyberspace, Border, and Immigration Securities., 6283296, pp. 24-29, 2012 10th IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics, ISI 2012, Washington, DC, United States, 6/11/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISI.2012.6283296
Benjamin V, Chen H. Securing cyberspace: Identifying key actors in hacker communities. In ISI 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics: Cyberspace, Border, and Immigration Securities. 2012. p. 24-29. 6283296 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISI.2012.6283296
Benjamin, Victor ; Chen, Hsinchun. / Securing cyberspace : Identifying key actors in hacker communities. ISI 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics: Cyberspace, Border, and Immigration Securities. 2012. pp. 24-29
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