Seizing academic power: Indigenous subaltern voices, metaliteracy, and counternarratives in higher education

Perry - Gilmore, David M. Smith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter draws on examples from our mentoring experiences and collaboration with Alaska Native and Australian Aboriginal graduate students in higher education. We describe and analyze efforts to create academic narratives designed to counter the conventional discourse shaping graduate education and characterizing much existing academic literature. We document deliberate resistance to established "grand narratives" and mainstream academic texts that frequently misrepresent, misinterpret, and stereotype Indigenous populations. We explore ways in which students have adopted successful and creative ways to use counternarratives and other forms of expression that (a) more accurately and respectfully present Indigenous knowledge, epistemologies, and worldviews, and(b) reflect presentations of self (both in style and content) more consistent with individual and community identities. The literacy strategies we describe affirm subaltern knowledge, create "free spaces" for authentic voices, and provide access to academic power.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLanguage, Literacy, and Power in Schooling
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates
Pages67-88
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)1410613542, 9781410613547
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2005

Fingerprint

graduate
narrative
worldview
mentoring
epistemology
stereotype
education
student
literacy
discourse
present
knowledge
community
experience
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Gilmore, P. ., & Smith, D. M. (2005). Seizing academic power: Indigenous subaltern voices, metaliteracy, and counternarratives in higher education. In Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling (pp. 67-88). Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781410613547

Seizing academic power : Indigenous subaltern voices, metaliteracy, and counternarratives in higher education. / Gilmore, Perry -; Smith, David M.

Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005. p. 67-88.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gilmore, P & Smith, DM 2005, Seizing academic power: Indigenous subaltern voices, metaliteracy, and counternarratives in higher education. in Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 67-88. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781410613547
Gilmore P, Smith DM. Seizing academic power: Indigenous subaltern voices, metaliteracy, and counternarratives in higher education. In Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 2005. p. 67-88 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781410613547
Gilmore, Perry - ; Smith, David M. / Seizing academic power : Indigenous subaltern voices, metaliteracy, and counternarratives in higher education. Language, Literacy, and Power in Schooling. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005. pp. 67-88
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