Self-transcendence and burnout in hospice and oncology nurses

Laura S. Hunnibell, Pamela G. Reed, Mary Quinn-Griffin, Joyce J. Fitzpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-transcendence is both a developmental point and an innate coping resource that allows one to overcome one's own ego concerns in a search for new perspectives and meaning. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in self-transcendence between hospice and oncology nurses and identify relationships between self-transcendence and the three aspects of burnout syndrome: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Reed's theory of self-transcendence was used. The sample included 563 nurses, 244 hospice nurses, and 319 oncology nurses in the United States who completed mailed surveys. There were significant differences in self-transcendence between hospice and oncology nurses (P < .001). Significant correlations existed between self-transcendence and the three aspects of burnout for both groups of nurses (P < .01). Additional study is needed to further explore self-transcendence in nurses and identify effective ways to promote and nurture nurses' self-transcendence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-179
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Hospice nurses
  • Oncology nurses
  • Self-transcendence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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