Serum urate gene associations with incident gout, measured in the Framingham Heart Study, are modified by renal disease and not by body mass index

Richard J. Reynolds, Ana I. Vazquez, Vinodh Srinivasasainagendra, Yann C Klimentidis, S. Louis Bridges, David B. Allison, Jasvinder A. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We hypothesized that serum urate-associated SNPs, individually or collectively, interact with BMI and renal disease to contribute to risk of incident gout. We measured the incidence of gout and associated comorbidities using the original and offspring cohorts of the Framingham Heart Study. We used direct and imputed genotypes for eight validated serum urate loci. We fit binomial regression models of gout incidence as a function of the covariates, age, type 2 diabetes, sex, and all main and interaction effects of the eight serum urate SNPs with BMI and renal disease. Models were also fit with a genetic risk score for serum urate levels which corresponds to the sum of risk alleles at the eight SNPs. Model covariates, age (P = 5.95E−06), sex (P = 2.46E−39), diabetes (P = 2.34E−07), BMI (P = 1.14E−11) and the SNPs, rs1967017 (P = 9.54E−03), rs13129697 (P = 4.34E−07), rs2199936 (P = 7.28E−03) and rs675209 (P = 4.84E−02) were all associated with incident gout. No BMI by SNP or BMI by serum urate genetic risk score interactions were statistically significant, but renal disease by rs1106766 was statistically significant (P = 6.12E−03). We demonstrated that minor alleles of rs1106766 (intergenic, INHBC) were negatively associated with the risk of incident gout in subjects without renal disease, but not for individuals with renal disease. These analyses demonstrate that a significant component of the risk of gout may involve complex interplay between genes and environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-270
Number of pages8
JournalRheumatology International
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Gout
Uric Acid
Body Mass Index
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Kidney
Serum
Genes
Alleles
Incidence
Statistical Models
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Comorbidity
Genotype

Keywords

  • Genetic urate score
  • Gout comorbidities
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Serum urate gene associations with incident gout, measured in the Framingham Heart Study, are modified by renal disease and not by body mass index. / Reynolds, Richard J.; Vazquez, Ana I.; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Klimentidis, Yann C; Bridges, S. Louis; Allison, David B.; Singh, Jasvinder A.

In: Rheumatology International, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 263-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reynolds, Richard J. ; Vazquez, Ana I. ; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh ; Klimentidis, Yann C ; Bridges, S. Louis ; Allison, David B. ; Singh, Jasvinder A. / Serum urate gene associations with incident gout, measured in the Framingham Heart Study, are modified by renal disease and not by body mass index. In: Rheumatology International. 2016 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 263-270.
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