Service Design and Citizen Satisfaction with E-Government Services: A Multidimensional Perspective

Frank K.Y. Chan, James Y.L. Thong, Susan A. Brown, Viswanath Venkatesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research examines the relationship between service design and citizen satisfaction with e-government services. Based on a multidimensional conceptualization of service, we define three key service perceptions, each comprising different design characteristics, that jointly influence perceived service quality and citizen satisfaction with e-government services. The service perceptions and their corresponding design characteristics are: (1) perceptions of a core service—accuracy, completeness, self-service capability, and convenience; (2) perceptions of facilitating services—accessibility, privacy protection, security protection, and user support; and (3) perceptions of supporting services—personalization capability and transparency. We tested our research model using data from a two-stage survey of 3,065 users of three e-government services. The results showed that all design characteristics contributed to their respective service perceptions that influenced perceived service quality that in turn influenced citizen satisfaction. The finding of a three-way interaction among the service perceptions supported their complementary role in influencing perceived service quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPublic Administration Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Service Design and Citizen Satisfaction with E-Government Services: A Multidimensional Perspective'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this