Sex and race differences in the association between statin use and the incidence of Alzheimer disease

Julie M. Zissimopoulos, Douglas Barthold, Roberta Diaz Brinton, Geoffrey Joyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

94 Scopus citations

Abstract

IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, no effective treatments exist for Alzheimer disease, and new molecules are years away. However, several drugs prescribed for other conditions have been associated with reducing its risk. OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between statin exposure and Alzheimer disease incidence among Medicare beneficiaries. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We examined the medical and pharmacy claims of a 20%sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2006 to 2013 and compared rates of Alzheimer disease diagnosis for 399 979 statin users 65 years of age or older with high or low exposure to statins and with drug molecules for black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white people, and men and women of Asian, Native American, or unkown race/ethnicity who are referred to as "other." MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcomewas incident diagnosis of Alzheimer disease based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification.We used Cox proportional hazard models to analyze the association between statin exposure and Alzheimer disease diagnosis for different sexes, races and ethnicities, and statin molecules. RESULTS The 399 979 study participants included 7794 (1.95%) black men, 24 484 (6.12%) black women, 11 200 (2.80%) Hispanic men, 21 458 (5.36%) Hispanic women, 115 059 (28.77%) white men, and 195 181 (48.80%) white women. High exposure to statins was associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer disease diagnosis for women (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95%CI, 0.82-0.89; P<.001) and men (HR, 0.88; 95%CI, 0.83-0.93; P<.001). Simvastatin was associated with lower Alzheimer disease risk for white women (HR, 0.86; 95%CI, 0.81-0.92; P<.001), white men (HR, 0.90; 95%CI, 0.82-0.99; P=.02), Hispanic women (HR, 0.82; 95%CI, 0.68-0.99; P=.04), Hispanic men (HR, 0.67; 95%CI, 0.50-0.91; P=.01), and black women (HR, 0.78; 95%CI, 0.66-0.93; P=.005). Atorvastatin was associated with a reduced risk of incident Alzheimer disease diagnosis for white women (HR, 0.84, 95% CI, 0.78-0.89), black women (HR, 0.81, 95%CI, 0.67-0.98), and Hispanic men (HR, 0.61, 95% CI, 0.42-0.89) and women (HR, 0.76, 95%CI, 0.60-0.97). Pravastatin and rosuvastatin were associated with reduced Alzheimer disease risk for white women only (HR, 0.82, 95%CI, 0.70-0.95 and HR, 0.81, 95%CI, 0.67-0.98, respectively). High statin exposure was not associated with a statistically significant lower Alzheimer disease risk among black men. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The reduction in Alzheimer disease risk varied across statin molecules, sex, and race/ethnicity. Clinical trials that include racial and ethnic groups need to confirm these findings. Because statins may affect Alzheimer disease risk, physicians should consider which statin is prescribed to each patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-232
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA Neurology
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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