Sex differences in identifying the facial affect of normal and mirror-reversed faces

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influences of sex and lateralized visual hemispace bias in the judgment of the emotional valence of faces during a free-viewing condition are evaluated. 73 subjects (aged 18 to 52 yr.) viewed videotaped facial expressions of emotion in normal and mirror-reversed orientation and classified each face as a positive, negative, or neutral expression. There was a significant interaction between the sex of the rater and the orientation of the face that influenced the proportion of correct classifications. Male and female perceivers did not differ in the accuracy of their affect judgments for faces viewed in normal orientation, whereas reversal of the orientation of the faces resulted in a significant enhancement of accuracy judgments for the males but not the females. The results suggest greater cerebral lateralization of perceptual processes in males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-530
Number of pages6
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume91
Issue number2
StatePublished - Oct 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Sex Characteristics
Facial Expression
Sexual Behavior
Emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Sex differences in identifying the facial affect of normal and mirror-reversed faces. / Killgore, William.

In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 91, No. 2, 10.2000, p. 525-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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