Sexism versus partisanship: A new look at the question of whether America is ready for a woman president

Erika Falk, Kate Kenski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We question the validity of traditional polling about the likelihood of respondents to vote for a woman president and argue that the use of such polls may overestimate sexism and underestimate the role that party identification and individual characteristics play in deciding about whether to vote for a woman president. Our analysis of data collected in May-June 2004 show that many people who say they will not vote for a woman for president would do so if given realistic, specific, political scenarios via head-to-head match-ups with potential candidates. Although survey respondents preferred George W. Bush to Hillary Clinton, the margin between these candidates was close especially considering that Bush had been actively campaigning for months, whereas Clinton had not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-428
Number of pages16
JournalSex Roles
Volume54
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

Keywords

  • Elections
  • Hillary Clinton
  • Presidential campaigns
  • Women candidates
  • Women politicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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