Shaping a stories of resilience model from urban American Indian elders' narratives of historical trauma and resilience

Kerstin Mulle Reinschmidt, Agnes Attakai, Carmella B. Kahn, Shannon Whitewater, Nicolette I Teufel-Shone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

American Indians (AIs) have experienced traumatizing events but practice remarkable resilience to large-scale and long-term adversities. Qualitative, community-based participatory research served to collect urban AI elders' life narratives on historical trauma and resilience strategies. A consensus group of 15 elders helped finalize open-ended questions that guided 13 elders in telling their stories. Elders shared multifaceted personal stories that revealed the interconnectedness between historical trauma and resilience, and between traditional perceptions connecting past and present, and individuals, families, and communities. Based on the elders' narratives, and supported by the literature, an explanatory Stories of Resilience Model was developed

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-85
Number of pages23
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
resilience
trauma
Community-Based Participatory Research
narrative
Wounds and Injuries
Consensus
community
Elders
Trauma
American Indians
Resilience
event
present
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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AU - Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I

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