Short-term β-carotene supplementation of lactating mothers consuming diets low in vitamin A

Louise M. Canfield, Douglas L Taren, Rina G. Kaminsky, Zeenat Mahal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously shown that β-carotene supplementation of the diets of healthy U.S. mothers increases serum and milk β-carotene concentrations. Building on these results, we investigated the possibility that β-carotene supplementation could enhance the vitamin A status of mothers and their nursing infants. Three 30-mg doses of β-carotene were administered on 3 consecutive days to 44 lactating mothers who had vitamin-A-poor diets. Concentrations of maternal serum and milk carotenoids and retinol were evaluated at baseline and after 2 and 3 days of supplementation. Infant serum carotenoids and retinol were measured at baseline and 2 days following maternal supplementation. β-Carotene supplementation markedly elevated maternal serum and milk β-carotene concentrations (nine- and sevenfold, respectively) and resulted in smaller, transient increases of α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations in maternal serum. Maternal serum and milk retinol were unchanged in response to the treatment. In contrast, maternal β-carotene supplementation significantly increased infant serum retinol (P ≤ 0.001) and β-carotene concentrations remained unchanged. These results imply that breast milk β-carotene can supply retinol for the nursing infant. Further research is needed to identify the site of bioconversion of milk-derived β-carotene to retinol and to describe the factors that regulate this process. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)532-538
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1999

Fingerprint

Carotenoids
Nutrition
Vitamin A
Mothers
Diet
Milk
Serum
Nursing
Bioconversion
Human Milk

Keywords

  • β-carotene
  • Breast milk
  • Carotenoids
  • Infant nutrition
  • Retinol
  • Supplementation
  • Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Short-term β-carotene supplementation of lactating mothers consuming diets low in vitamin A. / Canfield, Louise M.; Taren, Douglas L; Kaminsky, Rina G.; Mahal, Zeenat.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 10, No. 9, 09.1999, p. 532-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Canfield, Louise M. ; Taren, Douglas L ; Kaminsky, Rina G. ; Mahal, Zeenat. / Short-term β-carotene supplementation of lactating mothers consuming diets low in vitamin A. In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 1999 ; Vol. 10, No. 9. pp. 532-538.
@article{c8536a1dada543d1aa42dc6e20662716,
title = "Short-term β-carotene supplementation of lactating mothers consuming diets low in vitamin A",
abstract = "We have previously shown that β-carotene supplementation of the diets of healthy U.S. mothers increases serum and milk β-carotene concentrations. Building on these results, we investigated the possibility that β-carotene supplementation could enhance the vitamin A status of mothers and their nursing infants. Three 30-mg doses of β-carotene were administered on 3 consecutive days to 44 lactating mothers who had vitamin-A-poor diets. Concentrations of maternal serum and milk carotenoids and retinol were evaluated at baseline and after 2 and 3 days of supplementation. Infant serum carotenoids and retinol were measured at baseline and 2 days following maternal supplementation. β-Carotene supplementation markedly elevated maternal serum and milk β-carotene concentrations (nine- and sevenfold, respectively) and resulted in smaller, transient increases of α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations in maternal serum. Maternal serum and milk retinol were unchanged in response to the treatment. In contrast, maternal β-carotene supplementation significantly increased infant serum retinol (P ≤ 0.001) and β-carotene concentrations remained unchanged. These results imply that breast milk β-carotene can supply retinol for the nursing infant. Further research is needed to identify the site of bioconversion of milk-derived β-carotene to retinol and to describe the factors that regulate this process. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.",
keywords = "β-carotene, Breast milk, Carotenoids, Infant nutrition, Retinol, Supplementation, Vitamin A",
author = "Canfield, {Louise M.} and Taren, {Douglas L} and Kaminsky, {Rina G.} and Zeenat Mahal",
year = "1999",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/S0955-2863(99)00041-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "532--538",
journal = "Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry",
issn = "0955-2863",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Short-term β-carotene supplementation of lactating mothers consuming diets low in vitamin A

AU - Canfield, Louise M.

AU - Taren, Douglas L

AU - Kaminsky, Rina G.

AU - Mahal, Zeenat

PY - 1999/9

Y1 - 1999/9

N2 - We have previously shown that β-carotene supplementation of the diets of healthy U.S. mothers increases serum and milk β-carotene concentrations. Building on these results, we investigated the possibility that β-carotene supplementation could enhance the vitamin A status of mothers and their nursing infants. Three 30-mg doses of β-carotene were administered on 3 consecutive days to 44 lactating mothers who had vitamin-A-poor diets. Concentrations of maternal serum and milk carotenoids and retinol were evaluated at baseline and after 2 and 3 days of supplementation. Infant serum carotenoids and retinol were measured at baseline and 2 days following maternal supplementation. β-Carotene supplementation markedly elevated maternal serum and milk β-carotene concentrations (nine- and sevenfold, respectively) and resulted in smaller, transient increases of α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations in maternal serum. Maternal serum and milk retinol were unchanged in response to the treatment. In contrast, maternal β-carotene supplementation significantly increased infant serum retinol (P ≤ 0.001) and β-carotene concentrations remained unchanged. These results imply that breast milk β-carotene can supply retinol for the nursing infant. Further research is needed to identify the site of bioconversion of milk-derived β-carotene to retinol and to describe the factors that regulate this process. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

AB - We have previously shown that β-carotene supplementation of the diets of healthy U.S. mothers increases serum and milk β-carotene concentrations. Building on these results, we investigated the possibility that β-carotene supplementation could enhance the vitamin A status of mothers and their nursing infants. Three 30-mg doses of β-carotene were administered on 3 consecutive days to 44 lactating mothers who had vitamin-A-poor diets. Concentrations of maternal serum and milk carotenoids and retinol were evaluated at baseline and after 2 and 3 days of supplementation. Infant serum carotenoids and retinol were measured at baseline and 2 days following maternal supplementation. β-Carotene supplementation markedly elevated maternal serum and milk β-carotene concentrations (nine- and sevenfold, respectively) and resulted in smaller, transient increases of α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations in maternal serum. Maternal serum and milk retinol were unchanged in response to the treatment. In contrast, maternal β-carotene supplementation significantly increased infant serum retinol (P ≤ 0.001) and β-carotene concentrations remained unchanged. These results imply that breast milk β-carotene can supply retinol for the nursing infant. Further research is needed to identify the site of bioconversion of milk-derived β-carotene to retinol and to describe the factors that regulate this process. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

KW - β-carotene

KW - Breast milk

KW - Carotenoids

KW - Infant nutrition

KW - Retinol

KW - Supplementation

KW - Vitamin A

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032842909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032842909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0955-2863(99)00041-8

DO - 10.1016/S0955-2863(99)00041-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 15539333

AN - SCOPUS:0032842909

VL - 10

SP - 532

EP - 538

JO - Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry

JF - Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry

SN - 0955-2863

IS - 9

ER -