Si micropyramid patterned anodes that can suppress fracture and solid electrolyte interface formation during electrochemical cycling

Haokun Deng, Geng Chu, Fei Luo, Hong Li, Liquan Chen, Katerina E Aifantis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two new types of Si patterned surfaces are presented that have either a solid micropyramid structure or a double microstructure in which nanopores are induced on the pyramid surface. The pyramid diameter ranges between 1 and 6 μm, while the pores are 50–100 nm in diameter and ∼100–400 nm deep. It is illustrated that when they are employed as anodes, in Li-ion batteries, these patterned anodes, at high current densities of 1C, can (i) retain their initial morphology intact, despite the ∼400% expansion that Si experiences upon lithiation, and (ii) minimize the formation of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) that forms upon decomposition of the electrolyte. Furthermore, for the nanoporous-micropyramids, scanning electron microscopy after twenty-five electrochemical cycles reveals that no fracture occurs in either high (1 C) or low (0.1 C) current densities. This is a unique and significant observation as similar experiments, at 0.1 C, on the solid micropyramid surfaces indicate severe fracture from the first Li-insertion. It is therefore concluded that introducing a nanostructure on micropyramids significantly enhances their structural stability. This suggests that microscale Si with induced nanopores is an alternative anode candidate to nanoscale Si.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-378
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Power Sources
Volume329
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2016

Fingerprint

Solid electrolytes
solid electrolytes
Anodes
anodes
Nanopores
electrolytes
pyramids
cycles
Current density
current density
structural stability
low currents
solid surfaces
microbalances
Electrolytes
high current
electric batteries
insertion
Nanostructures
Decomposition

Keywords

  • Anodes
  • Binary structure
  • Micropyramids
  • Nanopores
  • Si

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Si micropyramid patterned anodes that can suppress fracture and solid electrolyte interface formation during electrochemical cycling. / Deng, Haokun; Chu, Geng; Luo, Fei; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan; Aifantis, Katerina E.

In: Journal of Power Sources, Vol. 329, 15.10.2016, p. 372-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Aifantis, Katerina E

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