Significant late Neogene east-west extension in northern Tibet

An Yin, Paul A Kapp, Michael A. Murphy, Craig E. Manning, T. Mark Harrison, Marty Grove, Ding Lin, Deng Xi-Guang, Wu Cun-Ming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Field mapping in northern Tibet reveals that the normal slip along late Cenozoic north-south-trending faults is comparable to that estimated for equivalent structures in southern Tibet. The orientation of fault striations in two north-south-trending rifts suggests an eastnortheast-west-northwest direction of extension in northern Tibet, which in turn implies that northeast-striking active faults in northern Tibet have significant left-slip components. Initiation of rifting in northern Tibet postdates the early Oligocene, and possibly occurred after 4 Ma. The broad similarities in the magnitude of slip and the direction of extension for normal faults in both northern and southern Tibet imply that the entire plateau has been extending. This precludes significant eastward extrusion of north Tibet relative to south Tibet and requires a regional boundary condition as the cause of east-west extension for the entire Tibet plateau.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-790
Number of pages4
JournalGeology
Volume27
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Neogene
plateau
striation
active fault
extrusion
normal fault
rifting
Oligocene
boundary condition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

Cite this

Yin, A., Kapp, P. A., Murphy, M. A., Manning, C. E., Harrison, T. M., Grove, M., ... Cun-Ming, W. (1999). Significant late Neogene east-west extension in northern Tibet. Geology, 27(9), 787-790.

Significant late Neogene east-west extension in northern Tibet. / Yin, An; Kapp, Paul A; Murphy, Michael A.; Manning, Craig E.; Harrison, T. Mark; Grove, Marty; Lin, Ding; Xi-Guang, Deng; Cun-Ming, Wu.

In: Geology, Vol. 27, No. 9, 09.1999, p. 787-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yin, A, Kapp, PA, Murphy, MA, Manning, CE, Harrison, TM, Grove, M, Lin, D, Xi-Guang, D & Cun-Ming, W 1999, 'Significant late Neogene east-west extension in northern Tibet', Geology, vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 787-790.
Yin A, Kapp PA, Murphy MA, Manning CE, Harrison TM, Grove M et al. Significant late Neogene east-west extension in northern Tibet. Geology. 1999 Sep;27(9):787-790.
Yin, An ; Kapp, Paul A ; Murphy, Michael A. ; Manning, Craig E. ; Harrison, T. Mark ; Grove, Marty ; Lin, Ding ; Xi-Guang, Deng ; Cun-Ming, Wu. / Significant late Neogene east-west extension in northern Tibet. In: Geology. 1999 ; Vol. 27, No. 9. pp. 787-790.
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