Silver & silver-bearing minerals

T. C. Wallace, Mark D Barton, W. E. Wilson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Today the annual worldwide production of silver is approximately 14 000 metric tons, more than at any time in history. Most of this silver is recovered as a byproduct of low-grade copper and lead mining. This fact, coupled with the historically low price of silver (~$5 US/troy once) and the continued mechanization of even high-grade mines, has greatly reduced the availability of "new' silver mineral specimens on the market. Only Mexico, Peru, and, to a lesser extent, Kazahkstan have produced a significant volume of specimen material in the last decade. Nevertheless, silver is an extremely important industrial metal, and the future is bright for more spectacular specimens. This article begins with a discussion of the history, mineralogy, and geology of the silver minerals, followed by a discussion of five classic localities. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRocks & Minerals
Pages16-38
Number of pages23
Volume69
Edition1
StatePublished - 1994

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silver
mineral
history
mineralogy
geology
copper
market
metal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Wallace, T. C., Barton, M. D., & Wilson, W. E. (1994). Silver & silver-bearing minerals. In Rocks & Minerals (1 ed., Vol. 69, pp. 16-38)

Silver & silver-bearing minerals. / Wallace, T. C.; Barton, Mark D; Wilson, W. E.

Rocks & Minerals. Vol. 69 1. ed. 1994. p. 16-38.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wallace, TC, Barton, MD & Wilson, WE 1994, Silver & silver-bearing minerals. in Rocks & Minerals. 1 edn, vol. 69, pp. 16-38.
Wallace TC, Barton MD, Wilson WE. Silver & silver-bearing minerals. In Rocks & Minerals. 1 ed. Vol. 69. 1994. p. 16-38
Wallace, T. C. ; Barton, Mark D ; Wilson, W. E. / Silver & silver-bearing minerals. Rocks & Minerals. Vol. 69 1. ed. 1994. pp. 16-38
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