Simulation-based shop floor control

Young-Jun Son, Sanjay B. Joshi, Richard A. Wysk, Jeffrey S. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of simulation-based shop floor control. Much of the work described is based on research conducted in the Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Lab at The Pennsylvania State University, the Texas A&M Computer Aided Manufacturing Lab (TAMCAM), Technion in Israel, and the University of Arizona CIM lab over the past decade. In this approach, a discrete event simulation is used not only as a traditional analysis and evaluation tool but also as a task generator that drives shop floor operations in real time. To enable this, a special feature of the Arena™ simulation language was used whereby the simulation model interacts directly with a shop floor execution system by sending and receiving messages. This control simulation reads process plans and master production orders from external data-bases that are updated by a process planning system and coordinated via an external business system. The control simulation also interacts with other external programs such as a planner, a scheduler, and an error detection and recovery function. In this paper, the architecture, implementation, and the integration of all the components of the proposed simulation-based control system are described in detail. Finally, extensions to this approach, including automatic model generation, are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-394
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Manufacturing Systems
Volume21
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Computer integrated manufacturing
Computer simulation languages
Error detection
Discrete event simulation
Process planning
Computer aided manufacturing
Control systems
Simulation
Shop floor control
Industry
Shopfloor

Keywords

  • CIM
  • Real-time Scheduling
  • Shop Floor Control
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Son, Y-J., Joshi, S. B., Wysk, R. A., & Smith, J. S. (2002). Simulation-based shop floor control. Journal of Manufacturing Systems, 21(5), 380-394.

Simulation-based shop floor control. / Son, Young-Jun; Joshi, Sanjay B.; Wysk, Richard A.; Smith, Jeffrey S.

In: Journal of Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 21, No. 5, 2002, p. 380-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Son, Y-J, Joshi, SB, Wysk, RA & Smith, JS 2002, 'Simulation-based shop floor control', Journal of Manufacturing Systems, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 380-394.
Son Y-J, Joshi SB, Wysk RA, Smith JS. Simulation-based shop floor control. Journal of Manufacturing Systems. 2002;21(5):380-394.
Son, Young-Jun ; Joshi, Sanjay B. ; Wysk, Richard A. ; Smith, Jeffrey S. / Simulation-based shop floor control. In: Journal of Manufacturing Systems. 2002 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 380-394.
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