Simulation of Integration of Bacillus thuringiensis and the Parasitoid Cotesia plutellae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) for Control of Susceptible and Resistant Diamondback Moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)

Charles F. Chilcutt, Bruce E Tabashnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used computer simulations to better understand how to combine the microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner and the parasitoid Cotesia plutellae Kurdjurnov to control diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). The simulations incorporated potential for the evolution of moth resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis with Bacillus thuringiensis-parasitoid-pest interactions. We considered the effects of pest immigration, pesticide refuge, and pesticide dose on diamondback moth control and resistance development by diamondback moth. Four major conclusions were drawn. First, C. plutellae and B thuringiensis could be used effectively to control diamondback moth. Second, the use of parasitoids such as C. plutellae could slow the evolution of pesticide resistance by decreasing the number of generations in which pesticide treatment is required. Third, parasitoids could be complementary to refuges from pesticides, with parasitoids maintaining control of a pest while refuges slow the development of resistance to the pesticide by the pest. Fourth, in conjunction with the use of parasitoids, high dose or low dose strategies have similar consequences on pest density over long periods. However, unless there is substantial immigration of susceptible individuals into the pest population or some type of pesticide refuge, a low dose strategy is better for controlling pests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-512
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Entomology
Volume28
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1999

Fingerprint

Cotesia plutellae
Plutellidae
Plutella xylostella
Braconidae
parasitoid
Bacillus thuringiensis
moth
pesticides
Hymenoptera
Lepidoptera
pests
pesticide
parasitoids
refuge
simulation
dosage
immigration
microbial insecticides
pesticide resistance
pest control

Keywords

  • Computer simulation
  • Integrated pest management
  • Population models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "We used computer simulations to better understand how to combine the microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner and the parasitoid Cotesia plutellae Kurdjurnov to control diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). The simulations incorporated potential for the evolution of moth resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis with Bacillus thuringiensis-parasitoid-pest interactions. We considered the effects of pest immigration, pesticide refuge, and pesticide dose on diamondback moth control and resistance development by diamondback moth. Four major conclusions were drawn. First, C. plutellae and B thuringiensis could be used effectively to control diamondback moth. Second, the use of parasitoids such as C. plutellae could slow the evolution of pesticide resistance by decreasing the number of generations in which pesticide treatment is required. Third, parasitoids could be complementary to refuges from pesticides, with parasitoids maintaining control of a pest while refuges slow the development of resistance to the pesticide by the pest. Fourth, in conjunction with the use of parasitoids, high dose or low dose strategies have similar consequences on pest density over long periods. However, unless there is substantial immigration of susceptible individuals into the pest population or some type of pesticide refuge, a low dose strategy is better for controlling pests.",
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