Situational correlates of condom use in a sample of African-American drug users who are primarily crack cocaine users

Michael W. Ross, Sandra C. Timpson, Mark L. Williams, Anne M. Bowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the situational determinants of condom use for vaginal sex in 151 African American crack cocaine users in Houston, Texas, using situational presentation (Sitpres) methodology, which uses hypothetical scenarios with randomly generated levels of eight variables across 10 scenarios that may impact the decision to use a condom. Multiple regression showed that variables associated with a high probability of using a condom were older age, how badly the partner wants to use a condom, and how badly the respondent wants vaginal sex. Crack craving or level of intoxication were not correlates. The Sitpres methodology was successfully used by these crack users and data indicated that it was sexual variables, rather than drug-associated variables, that were significantly associated with condom use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African American
  • Condoms
  • Crack cocaine
  • Sexual behavior
  • Situation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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