Slash and Trash: Dendroarchaeological and Ecological Inferences from a Twentieth-Century Logging Camp in Western New Mexico

Ronald H Towner, Nicolas V. Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Logging related sites and features are relatively common in forested areas of the western United States. Such sites are typically investigated through site mapping and artifact recording, and if possible, oral history. We present the results of a dendroarchaeological investigation of a small-scale unauthorized logging site in western New Mexico, US. The results provide information on the economic and social forces that created the site, as well as the scale of activities conducted there. We suggest that individuals quickly responded to improved lumber market conditions and changes in public land administration to exploit what had been an economically marginal timber stand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 30 2016

Fingerprint

market conditions
oral history
twentieth century
artifact
recording
timber
Mexico
market
history
economics
public
camp
land
Inference

Keywords

  • Cebolla Creek
  • Dendroarchaeology
  • Dendroecology
  • Historic logging
  • New Mexico

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Archaeology
  • History

Cite this

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