Sleep and reported daytime sleepiness in normal subjects

The Sleep Heart Health Study

Joyce A. Walsleben, Vishesh K. Kapur, Anne B. Newman, Eyal Shahar, Richard R Bootzin, Carl E. Rosenberg, George O'Connor, F. Javier Nieto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: To describe the distribution of nocturnal sleep characteristics and reports of daytime sleepiness in a large well-defined group of healthy adults. Design: The Sleep Heart Health Study is a multicenter study examining sleep and cardiopulmonary parameters through nocturnal polysomnography in adults enrolled in geographically distinct cardiovascular cohorts. Setting: Community setting. Participants: 470 subjects enrolled in the Sleep Heart Health Study (n = 6440) were selected as a 'normative' group based on screening of health conditions and daily habits that could interfere with sleep. Measurements and Results: Home-based nocturnal polysomnography was obtained on all participants and centrally scored for sleep and respiratory parameters. Demographic and health-related data were obtained and updated at the time of the home visit. Sleep efficiency decreased by 1.6% for each 10 years of increased age. Sleep time decreased by 0.1 hours (6.0 minutes) for each 10-year age increase and was longer in women. The arousal index increased by 0.8 for each 10-year increase in age and was lower by 1.4 in women. Women had a lower mean percentage of stage 1 and stage 2 sleep. Mean percentage of slow-wave sleep was higher in women (by 6.7%). Percentage of slow-wave sleep decreased with increased age for men only (by 1.9% for each 10-year age change). Conclusions: Data suggest a clear lessening in the quantity and quality of sleep with age that appears to be more rapid in males compared to females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-298
Number of pages6
JournalSleep
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2004

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Sleep
Health
Polysomnography
House Calls
Sleep Stages
Arousal
Multicenter Studies
Habits
Demography

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Home-based polysomnography
  • Normal subjects
  • Sleep
  • Sleep Heart Health Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Walsleben, J. A., Kapur, V. K., Newman, A. B., Shahar, E., Bootzin, R. R., Rosenberg, C. E., ... Nieto, F. J. (2004). Sleep and reported daytime sleepiness in normal subjects: The Sleep Heart Health Study. Sleep, 27(2), 293-298.

Sleep and reported daytime sleepiness in normal subjects : The Sleep Heart Health Study. / Walsleben, Joyce A.; Kapur, Vishesh K.; Newman, Anne B.; Shahar, Eyal; Bootzin, Richard R; Rosenberg, Carl E.; O'Connor, George; Nieto, F. Javier.

In: Sleep, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2004, p. 293-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walsleben, JA, Kapur, VK, Newman, AB, Shahar, E, Bootzin, RR, Rosenberg, CE, O'Connor, G & Nieto, FJ 2004, 'Sleep and reported daytime sleepiness in normal subjects: The Sleep Heart Health Study', Sleep, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 293-298.
Walsleben JA, Kapur VK, Newman AB, Shahar E, Bootzin RR, Rosenberg CE et al. Sleep and reported daytime sleepiness in normal subjects: The Sleep Heart Health Study. Sleep. 2004;27(2):293-298.
Walsleben, Joyce A. ; Kapur, Vishesh K. ; Newman, Anne B. ; Shahar, Eyal ; Bootzin, Richard R ; Rosenberg, Carl E. ; O'Connor, George ; Nieto, F. Javier. / Sleep and reported daytime sleepiness in normal subjects : The Sleep Heart Health Study. In: Sleep. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 293-298.
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