Small-cell carcinoma of the lung: combined chemotherapy and radiation. A Southwest oncology group study

Robert B Livingston, T. N. Moore, L. Heilbrun, R. Bottomley, D. Lehane, S. E. Rivkin, T. Thigpen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Chemotherapy (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and vincristine) was given in a sequential fashion with radiation of the primary tumor and brain to 358 patients with small-cell lung carcinoma (extensive disease in 250, limited in 108). Complete regression of tumor was obtained in 14% of patients with extensive disease and 41% of patients with limited disease, and complete or partial response in 57% and 75%, respectively. Median survival was 26 weeks for patients with extensive disease and 52 weeks for those with limited disease. Response duration was longer for patients in complete remission; one third had disease-free survival > 1 year. Toxicity from the combined treatment modalities was no greater than expected from the components given separately: fatal in 3.9%, and life-threatening but reversible in 8.4% of patients. Whole-brain radiation was effective in preventing isolated relapse at that site. This therapy appears both feasible and effective, with acceptable risks and some benefit to most patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-199
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume88
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Radiation
Drug Therapy
Vincristine
Brain Neoplasms
Doxorubicin
Cyclophosphamide
Disease-Free Survival
Recurrence
Survival
Brain
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Livingston, R. B., Moore, T. N., Heilbrun, L., Bottomley, R., Lehane, D., Rivkin, S. E., & Thigpen, T. (1978). Small-cell carcinoma of the lung: combined chemotherapy and radiation. A Southwest oncology group study. Annals of Internal Medicine, 88(2), 194-199.

Small-cell carcinoma of the lung : combined chemotherapy and radiation. A Southwest oncology group study. / Livingston, Robert B; Moore, T. N.; Heilbrun, L.; Bottomley, R.; Lehane, D.; Rivkin, S. E.; Thigpen, T.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 88, No. 2, 1978, p. 194-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Livingston, RB, Moore, TN, Heilbrun, L, Bottomley, R, Lehane, D, Rivkin, SE & Thigpen, T 1978, 'Small-cell carcinoma of the lung: combined chemotherapy and radiation. A Southwest oncology group study', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 194-199.
Livingston, Robert B ; Moore, T. N. ; Heilbrun, L. ; Bottomley, R. ; Lehane, D. ; Rivkin, S. E. ; Thigpen, T. / Small-cell carcinoma of the lung : combined chemotherapy and radiation. A Southwest oncology group study. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1978 ; Vol. 88, No. 2. pp. 194-199.
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AU - Moore, T. N.

AU - Heilbrun, L.

AU - Bottomley, R.

AU - Lehane, D.

AU - Rivkin, S. E.

AU - Thigpen, T.

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