Small-field neurons associated with oculomotor and optomotor control in muscoid flies: Functional organization

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21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In fleshflies, Sarcophaga bullata, intracellular recording and Lucifer yellow dye-filling have revealed small-field elements of sexually isomorphic retinotopic arrays in the lobula and lobula plate, the axons of which project to premotor channels in the deutocerebrum that supply head-turning and flight-steering motor neurons. The dendrites of the small-field elements visit very restricted oval areas of the retinotopic mosaic, comprising fields that are typically 6-8 input columns wide and 12-20 high. Their physiologically determined receptive fields are also small, typically 20° or less in diameter. The neurons are hyperpolarized in stationary illumination and are transiently depolarized by light OFF and to a lesser degree by light ON. Motion of a striped grating elicits a periodic excitation at the fundamental or second harmonic of the stimulus temporal contrast frequency. The arrangement of these elements in retinotopic arrays with their small receptive fields and flicker-sensitive dynamic properties make these neurons well suited for the position-dependent, direction-insensitive detection of small objects in the fly's visual field, which is known to drive fixation and tracking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-86
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume316
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992

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Sarcophagidae
Diptera
Neurons
Light
Motor Neurons
Dendrites
Visual Fields
Lighting
Axons
Coloring Agents
Head

Keywords

  • electrophysiology
  • identified neurons
  • insect vision
  • object detection
  • receptive fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "In fleshflies, Sarcophaga bullata, intracellular recording and Lucifer yellow dye-filling have revealed small-field elements of sexually isomorphic retinotopic arrays in the lobula and lobula plate, the axons of which project to premotor channels in the deutocerebrum that supply head-turning and flight-steering motor neurons. The dendrites of the small-field elements visit very restricted oval areas of the retinotopic mosaic, comprising fields that are typically 6-8 input columns wide and 12-20 high. Their physiologically determined receptive fields are also small, typically 20° or less in diameter. The neurons are hyperpolarized in stationary illumination and are transiently depolarized by light OFF and to a lesser degree by light ON. Motion of a striped grating elicits a periodic excitation at the fundamental or second harmonic of the stimulus temporal contrast frequency. The arrangement of these elements in retinotopic arrays with their small receptive fields and flicker-sensitive dynamic properties make these neurons well suited for the position-dependent, direction-insensitive detection of small objects in the fly's visual field, which is known to drive fixation and tracking.",
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N2 - In fleshflies, Sarcophaga bullata, intracellular recording and Lucifer yellow dye-filling have revealed small-field elements of sexually isomorphic retinotopic arrays in the lobula and lobula plate, the axons of which project to premotor channels in the deutocerebrum that supply head-turning and flight-steering motor neurons. The dendrites of the small-field elements visit very restricted oval areas of the retinotopic mosaic, comprising fields that are typically 6-8 input columns wide and 12-20 high. Their physiologically determined receptive fields are also small, typically 20° or less in diameter. The neurons are hyperpolarized in stationary illumination and are transiently depolarized by light OFF and to a lesser degree by light ON. Motion of a striped grating elicits a periodic excitation at the fundamental or second harmonic of the stimulus temporal contrast frequency. The arrangement of these elements in retinotopic arrays with their small receptive fields and flicker-sensitive dynamic properties make these neurons well suited for the position-dependent, direction-insensitive detection of small objects in the fly's visual field, which is known to drive fixation and tracking.

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KW - electrophysiology

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KW - receptive fields

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