Social demands, social supports, and psychological distress among low-income women

Emily D. Durden, Terrence Hill, Ronald J. Angel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate the association between social demands and psychological distress among low-income women. We argue that perceptions of excessive social demands can be psychologically distressing and examine the extent to which social demands predict psychological distress over 2 years. Our results reveal several important patterns. First, emotional, but not instrumental, demands are positively associated with psychological distress. Second, emotional and instrumental supports are more strongly associated with psychological distress than are emotional demands. Third, emotional support buffers the adverse effects of emotional demands. Finally, other chronic stressors, including economic hardship, neighborhood problems, and household disrepair, are more strongly associated with psychological distress than are social demands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-361
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

social association
Social Support
social support
low income
Psychology
Economics
economics
Social Perception
Buffers

Keywords

  • Low income
  • Mental health
  • Psychological distress
  • Social demands
  • Social negativity
  • Social support
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Social demands, social supports, and psychological distress among low-income women. / Durden, Emily D.; Hill, Terrence; Angel, Ronald J.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 24, No. 3, 06.2007, p. 343-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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