Social Relationships Among Family Caregivers: A Cross-Cultural Comparison Between Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic White Caregivers

Linda R. Phillips, Janice Crist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sometimes, clinicians assume caregivers in cultural groups believed to have large social networks and strong social support need little intervention from health professionals. This longitudinal study tests five hypotheses about the social relationships of Mexican American compared to non-Hispanic White caregivers and whether negative changes in social support affect perceived health. The sample includes 66 Mexican American and 92 non-Hispanic White caregivers. Findings show that social networks and social support are similar at baseline and similarly stable for 1 year. Negative changes in social support are correlated with poorer health perceptions. Findings underscore the importance of designing interventions that are culturally competent based on what the caregiver is experiencing rather than cultural stereotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-337
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Keywords

  • Mexican American caregiving
  • cross-cultural caregiving
  • gerontology
  • social networks
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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