Social Skills, Social Support, and Psychological Distress

A Test of the Social Skills Deficit Vulnerability Model

Chris G Segrin, Melissa Mcnelis, Paulina Swiatkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The social skills deficit vulnerability model predicts that poor social skills minimize opportunities to acquire social support, in turn, leading to the proliferation of psychological distress. This prediction was tested in a 2-wave longitudinal study that assessed 211 emerging adults at Time 1 (T1), with a 70% response rate 1 year later at Time 2 (T2). The results indicated that, after controlling for psychological distress at T1, social skills at T1 had an indirect effect on lower psychological distress at T2, through higher social support. Thus, people with poor social skills may be vulnerable to the development of psychological distress because they have less access the protective effects of social support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-137
Number of pages16
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Social Support
social support
deficit
vulnerability
Psychology
proliferation
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
time
Social Skills

Keywords

  • Psychological Distress
  • Social Skills
  • Social Support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Social Skills, Social Support, and Psychological Distress : A Test of the Social Skills Deficit Vulnerability Model. / Segrin, Chris G; Mcnelis, Melissa; Swiatkowski, Paulina.

In: Human Communication Research, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 122-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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