Social structure from multiple networks. I. Blockmodels of roles and positions

Harrison C. White, Scott A. Boorman, Ronald L Breiger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

986 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Networks of several distinct types of social tie are aggregated by a dual model that partitions a population while simultaneously identifying patterns of relations. Concepts and algorithms are demonstrated in five case studies involving up to 100 persons and up to eight types of tie, over as many as 15 time periods. In each case the model identifies a concrete social structure. Role and position concepts are then identified and interpreted in terms of these new models of concrete social structure. Part II, to be published in the May issue of this Journal (Boorman and White 1976), will show how the operational meaning of role structures in small populations can be generated from the sociometric blockmodels of Part I.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA730
Pages (from-to)730-780
Number of pages51
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume81
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Social structure from multiple networks. I. Blockmodels of roles and positions. / White, Harrison C.; Boorman, Scott A.; Breiger, Ronald L.

In: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 81, No. 4, A730, 1976, p. 730-780.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, Harrison C. ; Boorman, Scott A. ; Breiger, Ronald L. / Social structure from multiple networks. I. Blockmodels of roles and positions. In: American Journal of Sociology. 1976 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 730-780.
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