Sociohistorical factors in institutional efficacy

economic development in three American Indian cases

Stephen E Cornell, M. C. Gil-Swedberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Institutions of governance are key factors in successful economic development; that effective institutions, in turn, depend on legitimacy with constituent communities, itself a matter of the goodness of fit between formal institutions and informal institutions - essentially cultural repertoires; and that such legitimacy will be easier or more difficult to construct depending on the historically developed nature of those communities, the derivation of these formal institutions, and the degree of power they are free to exercise. The remainder of this article examines the cases of three Apache nations in the US Southwest to illustrate and test the plausibility of this argument. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-268
Number of pages30
JournalEconomic Development & Cultural Change
Volume43
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

American Indian
economic development
economics
legitimacy
cultural institution
community
governance
Factors
Economic development
Efficacy
American Indians
Formal institutions
Legitimacy
test
Goodness of fit
Informal institutions
Governance
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Sociohistorical factors in institutional efficacy : economic development in three American Indian cases. / Cornell, Stephen E; Gil-Swedberg, M. C.

In: Economic Development & Cultural Change, Vol. 43, No. 2, 1995, p. 239-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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