Sodium fluoride induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, and prostacyclin synthesis in cultured human endothelium

further evidence for regulation by a pertussis toxin-insensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

Joe GN Garcia, J. Dominguez, D. English

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins in the induction of prostacyclin synthesis by stimulated endothelial cells is incompletely understood. We report that sodium fluoride (NaF), a potent activator of cellular guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, affected time- and concentration-dependent generation of prostacyclin (PGI2) by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells without evidence of cellular toxicity detected by 51Cr or lactate dehydrogenase release. PGI2 synthesis by NaF-stimulated endothelial cells was associated with increases in arachidonate release, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, generation of inositol phosphates, and accumulation of diacylglycerol. These responses to NaF, as well as alpha-thrombin-mediated responses, were not dependent upon the availability of extracellular free Ca2+ but were associated with the mobilization of stored intracellular Ca2+ detected by the luminescence of the photoprotein aequorin. Neither PGI2 synthesis nor Ca2+ responses following alpha-thrombin or NaF stimulation were inhibited by pretreatment of cells with the islet activating protein from Bordetella pertussis but were significantly attenuated by the G protein inhibitor GDP beta S in permeabilized cells. Our results are compatible with a model wherein NaF directly activates a phosphoinositidase-linked guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, Gp, in human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. This activation results in phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, arachidonate release, and subsequent functional activation, assessed by PGI2 release. Biologically relevant agonists such as alpha-thrombin may exert their influence on arachidonate metabolism, in part, by promoting receptor-dependent activation of this G protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-124
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume5
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sodium Fluoride
Guanine Nucleotides
Pertussis Toxin
Epoprostenol
Phosphatidylinositols
Endothelium
Hydrolysis
Carrier Proteins
Endothelial cells
GTP-Binding Proteins
Thrombin
Chemical activation
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Endothelial Cells
Luminescent Proteins
Aequorin
Bordetella pertussis
Inositol Phosphates
Diglycerides
Luminescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Sodium fluoride induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, and prostacyclin synthesis in cultured human endothelium: further evidence for regulation by a pertussis toxin-insensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein.",
abstract = "The role of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins in the induction of prostacyclin synthesis by stimulated endothelial cells is incompletely understood. We report that sodium fluoride (NaF), a potent activator of cellular guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, affected time- and concentration-dependent generation of prostacyclin (PGI2) by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells without evidence of cellular toxicity detected by 51Cr or lactate dehydrogenase release. PGI2 synthesis by NaF-stimulated endothelial cells was associated with increases in arachidonate release, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, generation of inositol phosphates, and accumulation of diacylglycerol. These responses to NaF, as well as alpha-thrombin-mediated responses, were not dependent upon the availability of extracellular free Ca2+ but were associated with the mobilization of stored intracellular Ca2+ detected by the luminescence of the photoprotein aequorin. Neither PGI2 synthesis nor Ca2+ responses following alpha-thrombin or NaF stimulation were inhibited by pretreatment of cells with the islet activating protein from Bordetella pertussis but were significantly attenuated by the G protein inhibitor GDP beta S in permeabilized cells. Our results are compatible with a model wherein NaF directly activates a phosphoinositidase-linked guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, Gp, in human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. This activation results in phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, arachidonate release, and subsequent functional activation, assessed by PGI2 release. Biologically relevant agonists such as alpha-thrombin may exert their influence on arachidonate metabolism, in part, by promoting receptor-dependent activation of this G protein.",
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T1 - Sodium fluoride induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, and prostacyclin synthesis in cultured human endothelium

T2 - further evidence for regulation by a pertussis toxin-insensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

AU - Garcia, Joe GN

AU - Dominguez, J.

AU - English, D.

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N2 - The role of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins in the induction of prostacyclin synthesis by stimulated endothelial cells is incompletely understood. We report that sodium fluoride (NaF), a potent activator of cellular guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, affected time- and concentration-dependent generation of prostacyclin (PGI2) by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells without evidence of cellular toxicity detected by 51Cr or lactate dehydrogenase release. PGI2 synthesis by NaF-stimulated endothelial cells was associated with increases in arachidonate release, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, generation of inositol phosphates, and accumulation of diacylglycerol. These responses to NaF, as well as alpha-thrombin-mediated responses, were not dependent upon the availability of extracellular free Ca2+ but were associated with the mobilization of stored intracellular Ca2+ detected by the luminescence of the photoprotein aequorin. Neither PGI2 synthesis nor Ca2+ responses following alpha-thrombin or NaF stimulation were inhibited by pretreatment of cells with the islet activating protein from Bordetella pertussis but were significantly attenuated by the G protein inhibitor GDP beta S in permeabilized cells. Our results are compatible with a model wherein NaF directly activates a phosphoinositidase-linked guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, Gp, in human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. This activation results in phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, arachidonate release, and subsequent functional activation, assessed by PGI2 release. Biologically relevant agonists such as alpha-thrombin may exert their influence on arachidonate metabolism, in part, by promoting receptor-dependent activation of this G protein.

AB - The role of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins in the induction of prostacyclin synthesis by stimulated endothelial cells is incompletely understood. We report that sodium fluoride (NaF), a potent activator of cellular guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, affected time- and concentration-dependent generation of prostacyclin (PGI2) by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells without evidence of cellular toxicity detected by 51Cr or lactate dehydrogenase release. PGI2 synthesis by NaF-stimulated endothelial cells was associated with increases in arachidonate release, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, generation of inositol phosphates, and accumulation of diacylglycerol. These responses to NaF, as well as alpha-thrombin-mediated responses, were not dependent upon the availability of extracellular free Ca2+ but were associated with the mobilization of stored intracellular Ca2+ detected by the luminescence of the photoprotein aequorin. Neither PGI2 synthesis nor Ca2+ responses following alpha-thrombin or NaF stimulation were inhibited by pretreatment of cells with the islet activating protein from Bordetella pertussis but were significantly attenuated by the G protein inhibitor GDP beta S in permeabilized cells. Our results are compatible with a model wherein NaF directly activates a phosphoinositidase-linked guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, Gp, in human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers. This activation results in phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ mobilization, arachidonate release, and subsequent functional activation, assessed by PGI2 release. Biologically relevant agonists such as alpha-thrombin may exert their influence on arachidonate metabolism, in part, by promoting receptor-dependent activation of this G protein.

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