Soil-applied ZnEDTA: Vegetative growth, nut production, and nutrient acquisition of immature pecan trees grown in an alkaline, calcareous soil

James L. Walworth, Scott A. White, Mary J. Comeau, Richard J. Heerema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

A field study was conducted to evaluate efficacy of soil-applied zinc (Zn) fertilizer on young pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] trees growing in alkaline, calcareous soils. Chelated Zn ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (ZnEDTA) was applied at rates of 0, 2.2, or 4.4 kg·ha-1 of Zn via injection into irrigation water (fertigation) in microsprinkler irrigated ‘Western’ and ‘Wichita’ trees. Over the 5-year duration of the study, leaf Zn levels were increased from 22 to 35 µg·g-1 in the highest rate of ZnEDTA treatment compared with 7 to 14 µg·g-1 in unfertilized trees. Zn concentrations in shoot and root tissues were also elevated in Zn-treated trees. Zn treatments largely eliminated visible Zn deficiency symptoms, and increased trunk diameter growth compared with untreated trees. Nut yield (in the third through fifth seasons) were also increased as a result of Zn fertilization. No additional benefit in terms of trunk diameter growth or nut yield was observed by adding a higher rate of Zn (4.4 kg·ha-1) vs. the lower rate (2.2 kg·ha-1). ‘Western’ and ‘Wichita’ trees responded similarly to Zn fertigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-305
Number of pages5
JournalHortScience
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Carya illinoinensis
  • Chelate
  • EDTA
  • Fertigation
  • Nutrients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

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