Solar cycle variation of stratospheric ozone: Multiple regression analysis of long-term satellite data sets and comparisons with models

Boris E. Soukharev, Lon L. Hood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

132 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous multiple regression analyses of the solar cycle variation of stratospheric ozone are improved by (1) analyzing three independent satellite ozone data sets with lengths extending up to 25 years and (2) comparing column ozone measurements with ozone profile data during the 1992-2003 period when no major volcanic eruptions occurred. Results show that the vertical structure of the tropical ozone solar cycle response has been consistently characterized by statistically significant positive responses in the upper and lower stratosphere and by statistically insignificant responses in the middle stratosphere (∼28-38 km altitude). This vertical structure differs from that predicted by most models. The similar vertical structure in the tropics obtained for separate time intervals (with minimum response invariably near 10 hPa) is difficult to explain by random interference from the QBO and volcanic eruptions in the statistical analysis. The observed increase in tropical total column ozone approaching the cycle 23 maximum during the late 1990s occurred primarily in the lower stratosphere below the 30 hPa level. A mainly dynamical origin for the solar cycle total ozone variation at low latitudes is therefore likely. The amplitude of the solar cycle ozone variation in the tropical upper stratosphere derived here is somewhat reduced in comparison to earlier results. Additional data are needed to determine whether this upper stratospheric response is or is not larger than model estimates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberD20314
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres
Volume111
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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