Solution or Smokescreen? Evaluating Industry Self-Regulation of Televised Food Marketing to Children

Dale L Kunkel, Jessica Castonguay, Paul J. Wright, Christopher J. McKinley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well established that children's exposure to television advertising for unhealthy food products contributes to the epidemic of childhood obesity. Given this finding, public health officials recommended that the government restrict unhealthy food marketing to children if the industry does not accomplish that goal voluntarily. Food marketers responded by adopting industry self-regulation several years ago, but this study finds that it has produced only marginal improvements in the overall nutritional quality of foods advertised to youth. Unless federal policy-makers intervene, it appears that unhealthy food marketing to children will continue to contribute to childhood obesity in the future. © 2014

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-292
Number of pages30
JournalCommunication Law and Policy
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

self-regulation
Marketing
marketing
food
industry
Industry
childhood
federal policy
Public health
Television
television
public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Communication

Cite this

Solution or Smokescreen? Evaluating Industry Self-Regulation of Televised Food Marketing to Children. / Kunkel, Dale L; Castonguay, Jessica; Wright, Paul J.; McKinley, Christopher J.

In: Communication Law and Policy, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2014, p. 263-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kunkel, Dale L ; Castonguay, Jessica ; Wright, Paul J. ; McKinley, Christopher J. / Solution or Smokescreen? Evaluating Industry Self-Regulation of Televised Food Marketing to Children. In: Communication Law and Policy. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 263-292.
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