Something old and something new: A comment on new media, new civics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a response to the article by Ethan Zuckerman "New Media, New Civics?" published in this issue of Policy & Internet (2014: vol. 6, issue 2). Dissatisfaction with existing governments, a broad shift to "post-representative democracy" and the rise of participatory media are leading toward the visibility of different forms of civic participation. Zuckerman's article offers a framework to describe participatory civics in terms of theories of change used and demands places on the participant, and examines some of the implications of the rise of participatory civics, including the challenges of deliberation in a diverse and competitive digital public sphere. Jennifer Earl responds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-175
Number of pages7
JournalPolicy and Internet
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

leading medium
Democracy
representative democracy
deliberation
Visibility
Internet
new media
participation

Keywords

  • civics
  • collective action
  • Internet
  • new media
  • politics
  • protest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Something old and something new : A comment on new media, new civics. / Earl, Jennifer Suzanne.

In: Policy and Internet, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2014, p. 169-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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