Sorption of high explosives to water-dispersible clay: Influence of organic carbon, aluminosilicate clay, and extractable iron

Katerina M Dontsova, Charolett Hayes, Judith C. Pennington, Beth Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Explosives in soils can present environmental problems for military installations. Fine, mobile particles represent the most reactive fraction of the soil and, therefore, are expected to adsorb explosives and potentially facilitate their transport. The objective of this study was to determine the relative significance of phyllosilicate clay, organic matter, and two forms of extractable iron in adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by the colloidal water-dispersible clay (WDC) fraction of the soil. The WDC fraction of two mineral and one organic soil was separated and then treated to remove organic carbon (OC) and several forms of iron (Feo, oxalate extractable, and Fed, dithionite-citrate extractable). Adsorption coefficients were determined for whole soils, untreated, and treated WDC. For mineral soils, adsorption of TNT and RDX on the WDC was greater than on the whole soil. The presence of OC increased explosives sorption by WDC. When OC was removed, iron interfered with TNT sorption. In the presence of OC, removal of Feo decreased RDX adsorption and increased TNT adsorption indicating different adsorption mechanisms. Organic carbon was a more significant indicator of explosives adsorption by WDC than clays or iron oxides and hydroxides. Therefore, OC is the most likely medium for facilitated transport of TNT and RDX.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1458-1465
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Environmental Quality
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Aluminosilicates
aluminosilicate
Organic carbon
explosive
Sorption
Clay
trinitrotoluene
sorption
organic carbon
Iron
iron
clay
adsorption
Soils
Adsorption
Water
water
soil
Minerals
iron hydroxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Pollution
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Sorption of high explosives to water-dispersible clay : Influence of organic carbon, aluminosilicate clay, and extractable iron. / Dontsova, Katerina M; Hayes, Charolett; Pennington, Judith C.; Porter, Beth.

In: Journal of Environmental Quality, Vol. 38, No. 4, 07.2009, p. 1458-1465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{85da8c1cbc3f4d17aafdfc87638aa02a,
title = "Sorption of high explosives to water-dispersible clay: Influence of organic carbon, aluminosilicate clay, and extractable iron",
abstract = "Explosives in soils can present environmental problems for military installations. Fine, mobile particles represent the most reactive fraction of the soil and, therefore, are expected to adsorb explosives and potentially facilitate their transport. The objective of this study was to determine the relative significance of phyllosilicate clay, organic matter, and two forms of extractable iron in adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by the colloidal water-dispersible clay (WDC) fraction of the soil. The WDC fraction of two mineral and one organic soil was separated and then treated to remove organic carbon (OC) and several forms of iron (Feo, oxalate extractable, and Fed, dithionite-citrate extractable). Adsorption coefficients were determined for whole soils, untreated, and treated WDC. For mineral soils, adsorption of TNT and RDX on the WDC was greater than on the whole soil. The presence of OC increased explosives sorption by WDC. When OC was removed, iron interfered with TNT sorption. In the presence of OC, removal of Feo decreased RDX adsorption and increased TNT adsorption indicating different adsorption mechanisms. Organic carbon was a more significant indicator of explosives adsorption by WDC than clays or iron oxides and hydroxides. Therefore, OC is the most likely medium for facilitated transport of TNT and RDX.",
author = "Dontsova, {Katerina M} and Charolett Hayes and Pennington, {Judith C.} and Beth Porter",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
doi = "10.2134/jeq2008.0183",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "1458--1465",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Quality",
issn = "0047-2425",
publisher = "ASA/CSSA/SSSA",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sorption of high explosives to water-dispersible clay

T2 - Influence of organic carbon, aluminosilicate clay, and extractable iron

AU - Dontsova, Katerina M

AU - Hayes, Charolett

AU - Pennington, Judith C.

AU - Porter, Beth

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - Explosives in soils can present environmental problems for military installations. Fine, mobile particles represent the most reactive fraction of the soil and, therefore, are expected to adsorb explosives and potentially facilitate their transport. The objective of this study was to determine the relative significance of phyllosilicate clay, organic matter, and two forms of extractable iron in adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by the colloidal water-dispersible clay (WDC) fraction of the soil. The WDC fraction of two mineral and one organic soil was separated and then treated to remove organic carbon (OC) and several forms of iron (Feo, oxalate extractable, and Fed, dithionite-citrate extractable). Adsorption coefficients were determined for whole soils, untreated, and treated WDC. For mineral soils, adsorption of TNT and RDX on the WDC was greater than on the whole soil. The presence of OC increased explosives sorption by WDC. When OC was removed, iron interfered with TNT sorption. In the presence of OC, removal of Feo decreased RDX adsorption and increased TNT adsorption indicating different adsorption mechanisms. Organic carbon was a more significant indicator of explosives adsorption by WDC than clays or iron oxides and hydroxides. Therefore, OC is the most likely medium for facilitated transport of TNT and RDX.

AB - Explosives in soils can present environmental problems for military installations. Fine, mobile particles represent the most reactive fraction of the soil and, therefore, are expected to adsorb explosives and potentially facilitate their transport. The objective of this study was to determine the relative significance of phyllosilicate clay, organic matter, and two forms of extractable iron in adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by the colloidal water-dispersible clay (WDC) fraction of the soil. The WDC fraction of two mineral and one organic soil was separated and then treated to remove organic carbon (OC) and several forms of iron (Feo, oxalate extractable, and Fed, dithionite-citrate extractable). Adsorption coefficients were determined for whole soils, untreated, and treated WDC. For mineral soils, adsorption of TNT and RDX on the WDC was greater than on the whole soil. The presence of OC increased explosives sorption by WDC. When OC was removed, iron interfered with TNT sorption. In the presence of OC, removal of Feo decreased RDX adsorption and increased TNT adsorption indicating different adsorption mechanisms. Organic carbon was a more significant indicator of explosives adsorption by WDC than clays or iron oxides and hydroxides. Therefore, OC is the most likely medium for facilitated transport of TNT and RDX.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67650445564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67650445564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2134/jeq2008.0183

DO - 10.2134/jeq2008.0183

M3 - Article

C2 - 19465721

AN - SCOPUS:67650445564

VL - 38

SP - 1458

EP - 1465

JO - Journal of Environmental Quality

JF - Journal of Environmental Quality

SN - 0047-2425

IS - 4

ER -