Southern tomato virus: The link between the families Totiviridae and Partitiviridae

Sead Sabanadzovic, Rodrigo A. Valverde, Judith K Brown, Robert R. Martin, Ioannis E. Tzanetakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A dsRNA virus with a genome of 3.5 kb was isolated from field and greenhouse-grown tomato plants of different cultivars and geographic locations in North America. Cloning and sequencing of the viral genome showed the presence of two partially overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), and a genomic organization resembling members of the family Totiviridae that comprises fungal and protozoan viruses, but not plant viruses. The 5′-proximal ORF codes for a 377 amino acid-long protein of unknown function, whereas the product of ORF2 contains typical motifs of an RNA-dependant RNA-polymerase and is likely expressed by a +1 ribosomal frame shift. Despite the similarity in the genome organization with members of the family Totiviridae, this virus shared very limited sequence homology with known totiviruses or with other viruses. Repeated attempts to detect the presence of an endophytic fungus as the possible host of the virus failed, supporting its phytoviral nature. The virus was efficiently transmitted by seed but not mechanically and/or by grafting. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this virus, for which the name Southern tomato virus (STV) is proposed, belongs to a partitivirus-like lineage and represents a species of a new taxon of plant viruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-137
Number of pages8
JournalVirus Research
Volume140
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Totiviridae
Lycopersicon esculentum
Viruses
Plant Viruses
Totivirus
Open Reading Frames
Ribosomal Frameshifting
Genome
Geographic Locations
Nucleotide Motifs
Viral Genome
DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases
Sequence Homology
North America
Names
Organism Cloning
Seeds
Fungi

Keywords

  • Detection
  • DsRNA
  • Partitivirus
  • Sequences
  • Tomato
  • Totivirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Southern tomato virus : The link between the families Totiviridae and Partitiviridae. / Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.; Brown, Judith K; Martin, Robert R.; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E.

In: Virus Research, Vol. 140, No. 1-2, 03.2009, p. 130-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sabanadzovic, S, Valverde, RA, Brown, JK, Martin, RR & Tzanetakis, IE 2009, 'Southern tomato virus: The link between the families Totiviridae and Partitiviridae', Virus Research, vol. 140, no. 1-2, pp. 130-137. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2008.11.018
Sabanadzovic, Sead ; Valverde, Rodrigo A. ; Brown, Judith K ; Martin, Robert R. ; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E. / Southern tomato virus : The link between the families Totiviridae and Partitiviridae. In: Virus Research. 2009 ; Vol. 140, No. 1-2. pp. 130-137.
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