Spatial variability of small-basin paleoflood magnitudes for a southeastern Arizona mountain range

J. Martinez-Goytre, P. K. House, Victor Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paleoflood reconstructions in eight watersheds for the largest floods in stable canyon reaches, showed there is a high correlation between drainage area and flood magnitude. It is also clear that basins located in the southern half of the Santa Catalina Mountains have larger unit discharges (peak discharge divided by drainage area) than those in the northern part of the range. The northern part of the range experiences a rain shadow effect that decreases the unit discharges generated in those basins. The unusually high unit discharge for one of the south facing basins is explained by its basin morphometry. Inverse problem solutions using a rainfall-runoff model demonstrate that both this basin and another with a comparable drainage area but a much lower estimated peak paleoflood discharge can have their peak flood outputs produced by the same storm intensity. The results demonstrate the potential of paleoflood data collection for understanding spatial variability in small basin flood hydrology. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1491-1501
Number of pages11
JournalWater Resources Research
Volume30
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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paleoflood
mountains
basins
Drainage
basin
Catchments
Rain
drainage
Hydrology
Watersheds
Runoff
Inverse problems
rain
peak discharge
morphometry
canyons
inverse problem
hydrologic models
hydrology
canyon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Spatial variability of small-basin paleoflood magnitudes for a southeastern Arizona mountain range. / Martinez-Goytre, J.; House, P. K.; Baker, Victor.

In: Water Resources Research, Vol. 30, No. 5, 1994, p. 1491-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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