Spectropolarimetry of electro optical materials

Dennis H. Goldstein, Russell A Chipman, David B. Chenault

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper treats the fundamentals of infrared spectropolarimetry as a step in understanding and designing better spatial light modulators. It describes the issues in converting a Fourier transform tspectrometer to perform spectropolarimetric measurements, and includes mathematics to interpret the resulting spectropolarimetric data. Two distinct differences exist between this proposed instrumentation and previous infrared crystal optics studies; 1.) this instrument acquires data at all wavelengths within its spectral range, and 2.) it measures Mueller polarization matrices. Conventional measurements with laser polarimeters take birefringence data with applied fields at a few laser wavelengths. With the spectropolarimeter, data is obtained on and near absorption bands where the most interesting phenomenae occur. By measuring Mueller matrices as a function of wavelength, data is acquired on polarization and scattering, effects which will ultimately limit the performance of a modulating crystal. Thus, more data is available on which to compare materials and optimise modulator designs. Better modulators must result from such investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-73
Number of pages18
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume891
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electrooptical materials
Optical Materials
optical materials
polarimeters
Wavelength
Modulators
modulators
wavelengths
crystal optics
Polarization
Infrared radiation
Crystals
Polarimeters
Lasers
Modulator
polarization
mathematics
light modulators
matrices
Birefringence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Spectropolarimetry of electro optical materials. / Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chipman, Russell A; Chenault, David B.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 891, 29.06.1988, p. 56-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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