Spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease: Diagnosis with MR imaging versus myelography

Raymond F Carmody, P. J. Yang, G. W. Seeley, J. F. Seeger, Evan C Unger, J. E. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and myelography for the diagnosis of spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease, the authors prospectively examined 70 patients who had known or suspected spinal involvement by malignancy. Most MR examinations consisted of T1-weighted sagittal imaging of the entire spine, with additional sequences as needed for clarification. Extradural masses were found in 46 patients, 25 of whom had cord compression. For extradural masses causing cord compression, the sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging was .92 and .90, respectively, compared with .95 and .88 for myelography. For extradural masses without cord compression the sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging was .73 and .90, versus .49 and .88 for myelography. MR imaging was much more sensitive for metastases to bone (.90 vs .49), as expected. MR imaging is an acceptable alternative to myelography for diagnosing spinal cord compression, and is preferable as a first study because it is noninvasive and better tolerated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-229
Number of pages5
JournalRadiology
Volume173
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1989

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Myelography
Spinal Cord Compression
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Sensitivity and Specificity
Spine
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Neoplasm Metastasis
Bone and Bones
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Carmody, R. F., Yang, P. J., Seeley, G. W., Seeger, J. F., Unger, E. C., & Johnson, J. E. (1989). Spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease: Diagnosis with MR imaging versus myelography. Radiology, 173(1), 225-229.

Spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease : Diagnosis with MR imaging versus myelography. / Carmody, Raymond F; Yang, P. J.; Seeley, G. W.; Seeger, J. F.; Unger, Evan C; Johnson, J. E.

In: Radiology, Vol. 173, No. 1, 1989, p. 225-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carmody, RF, Yang, PJ, Seeley, GW, Seeger, JF, Unger, EC & Johnson, JE 1989, 'Spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease: Diagnosis with MR imaging versus myelography', Radiology, vol. 173, no. 1, pp. 225-229.
Carmody, Raymond F ; Yang, P. J. ; Seeley, G. W. ; Seeger, J. F. ; Unger, Evan C ; Johnson, J. E. / Spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease : Diagnosis with MR imaging versus myelography. In: Radiology. 1989 ; Vol. 173, No. 1. pp. 225-229.
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