Spontaneous rotational inversion in phycomyces

Alain Goriely, Michael Tabor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The filamentary fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus undergoes a series of remarkable transitions during aerial growth. During what is known as the stagea IV growth phase, the fungus extends while rotating in a counterclockwise manner when viewed from above (stagea IVa) and then, while continuing to grow, spontaneously reverses to a clockwise rotation (stagea IVb). This phase lasts for 24-48Ah and is sometimes followed by yet another reversal (stageAIVc) before the overall growth ends. Here, we propose a continuum mechanical model of this entire process using nonlinear, anisotropic, elasticity and show how helical anisotropy associated with the cell wall structure can induce spontaneous rotation and, under appropriate circumstances, the observed reversal of rotational handedness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number138103
JournalPhysical Review Letters
Volume106
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 31 2011

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fungi
inversions
handedness
elastic properties
continuums
anisotropy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Spontaneous rotational inversion in phycomyces. / Goriely, Alain; Tabor, Michael.

In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 106, No. 13, 138103, 31.03.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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