Squamous cells as predictors of bacterial contamination in urine samples

F. G. Walter, R. L. Gibly, R. K. Knopp, D. J. Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective: To determine whether squamous cells in urine indicate bacterial contamination. Methods: We prospectively studied 105 consecutive women who presented to the emergency department with symptoms suggestive of a urinary tract infection. Two urine samples were collected from each oman, a midstream clean-catch (MSCC) sample and a catheterized (CATH) sample. Microscopic urinalyses to assess for squamous cells nd urine cultures to assess for bacterial contamination were performed on all samples. Bacterial contamination was defined as growth of fewer than 10,000 colonies of a single species per milliliter or growth of three or more species of commensal bacteria (mixed flora) in a urine sample. Results: Squamous cells were found in 99 of 105 CATH samples (94%); however, no CATH samples had bacterial contamination. Squamous cells were found in 101 of 105 MSCC samples (96%); however, only 22 MSCC samples (21%) had bacterial contamination. Conclusion: The presence of squamous cells in CATH urine samples obtained from women is not indicative of bacterial contamination. The presence of squamous cells in MSCC urine samples obtained from women also is not a good indicator, with an overall predictive value for bacterial contamination of 21%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-458
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

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Epithelial Cells
Urine
Oman
Urinalysis
Growth
Urinary Tract Infections
Hospital Emergency Service
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Squamous cells as predictors of bacterial contamination in urine samples. / Walter, F. G.; Gibly, R. L.; Knopp, R. K.; Roe, D. J.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 4, 1998, p. 455-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Gibly, R. L.

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AU - Roe, D. J.

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N2 - Study objective: To determine whether squamous cells in urine indicate bacterial contamination. Methods: We prospectively studied 105 consecutive women who presented to the emergency department with symptoms suggestive of a urinary tract infection. Two urine samples were collected from each oman, a midstream clean-catch (MSCC) sample and a catheterized (CATH) sample. Microscopic urinalyses to assess for squamous cells nd urine cultures to assess for bacterial contamination were performed on all samples. Bacterial contamination was defined as growth of fewer than 10,000 colonies of a single species per milliliter or growth of three or more species of commensal bacteria (mixed flora) in a urine sample. Results: Squamous cells were found in 99 of 105 CATH samples (94%); however, no CATH samples had bacterial contamination. Squamous cells were found in 101 of 105 MSCC samples (96%); however, only 22 MSCC samples (21%) had bacterial contamination. Conclusion: The presence of squamous cells in CATH urine samples obtained from women is not indicative of bacterial contamination. The presence of squamous cells in MSCC urine samples obtained from women also is not a good indicator, with an overall predictive value for bacterial contamination of 21%.

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