Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-based science curricula in the context of urban reform

Robert Geier, Phyllis C. Blumenfeld, Ronald W Marx, Joseph S. Krajcik, Barry Fishman, Elliot Soloway, Juanita Clay-Chambers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

167 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable effort has been made over the past decade to address the needs of learners in large urban districts through scaleable reform initiatives. We examine the effects of a multifaceted scaling reform that focuses on supporting standards based science teaching in urban middle schools. The effort was one component of a systemic reform effort in the Detroit Public Schools, and was centered on highly specified and developed project-based inquiry science units supported by aligned professional development and learning technologies. Two cohorts of 7th and 8th graders that participated in the project units are compared with the remainder of the district population, using results from the highstakes state standardized test in science. Both the initial and scaled up cohorts show increases in science content understanding and process skills over their peers, and significantly higher pass rates on the statewide test. The relative gains occur up to a year and a half after participation in the curriculum, and show little attenuation with in the second cohort when scaling occurred and the number of teachers involved increased. The effect of participation in units at different grade levels is independent and cumulative, with higher levels of participation associated with similarly higher achievement scores. Examination of results by gender reveals that the curriculum effort succeeds in reducing the gender gap in achievement experienced by urban African-American boys. These findings demonstrate that standards-based, inquiry science curriculum can lead to standardized achievement test gains in historically underserved urban students, when the curriculum is highly specified, developed, and aligned with professional development and administrative support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)922-939
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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curriculum
reform
science
scaling
student
participation
district
gender
achievement test
school grade
examination
Teaching
teacher
school
learning

Keywords

  • General science
  • Middle school science
  • Program evaluation
  • Urban education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-based science curricula in the context of urban reform. / Geier, Robert; Blumenfeld, Phyllis C.; Marx, Ronald W; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Fishman, Barry; Soloway, Elliot; Clay-Chambers, Juanita.

In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Vol. 45, No. 8, 10.2008, p. 922-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Geier, Robert ; Blumenfeld, Phyllis C. ; Marx, Ronald W ; Krajcik, Joseph S. ; Fishman, Barry ; Soloway, Elliot ; Clay-Chambers, Juanita. / Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-based science curricula in the context of urban reform. In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 2008 ; Vol. 45, No. 8. pp. 922-939.
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