Staphylococcus aureus colonization before infection is not associated with mortality among S. aureus-infected patients: A meta-analysis

Marin L. Schweizer, Ann Bossen, Jennifer S. McDanel, Leslie K Dennis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objective. The literature is conflicted as to whether people colonized with Staphylococcus aureus are at an increased risk of mortality. The aim of this meta-analysis was to review and analyze the current literature to determine whether prior history of S. aureus colonization is associated with mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Methods. The PUBMED databases were searched with keywords related to S. aureus colonization and mortality. After reviewing 380 article abstracts and 59 articles in detail, only 7 studies had data on the association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Crude estimates of study odds ratios (ORs) were calculated on the basis of data from subset analyses. We pooled crude ORs from the 7 studies using a random-effects model. Woolf's test for heterogeneity was assessed.results. When all studies were pooled in a random-effects model, no association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was seen (pooled OR, 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-3.66]; n = 7; heterogeneity P = .05). When the analyses were restricted to infection-attributable mortality, the association between colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was not statistically significant (pooled OR, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.15-1.21]; n = 4; heterogeneity P = .28). Conclusions. S. aureus colonization was not associated with mortality among patients who developed an S. aureus infection. Interventions to decolonize S. aureus carriers may prevent S. aureus infections but may not be sufficient to prevent mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-802
Number of pages7
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Staphylococcus aureus
Meta-Analysis
Mortality
Infection
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Epidemiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Staphylococcus aureus colonization before infection is not associated with mortality among S. aureus-infected patients : A meta-analysis. / Schweizer, Marin L.; Bossen, Ann; McDanel, Jennifer S.; Dennis, Leslie K.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 33, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 796-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background and objective. The literature is conflicted as to whether people colonized with Staphylococcus aureus are at an increased risk of mortality. The aim of this meta-analysis was to review and analyze the current literature to determine whether prior history of S. aureus colonization is associated with mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Methods. The PUBMED databases were searched with keywords related to S. aureus colonization and mortality. After reviewing 380 article abstracts and 59 articles in detail, only 7 studies had data on the association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Crude estimates of study odds ratios (ORs) were calculated on the basis of data from subset analyses. We pooled crude ORs from the 7 studies using a random-effects model. Woolf's test for heterogeneity was assessed.results. When all studies were pooled in a random-effects model, no association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was seen (pooled OR, 1.08 [95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 0.32-3.66]; n = 7; heterogeneity P = .05). When the analyses were restricted to infection-attributable mortality, the association between colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was not statistically significant (pooled OR, 0.42 [95{\%} CI, 0.15-1.21]; n = 4; heterogeneity P = .28). Conclusions. S. aureus colonization was not associated with mortality among patients who developed an S. aureus infection. Interventions to decolonize S. aureus carriers may prevent S. aureus infections but may not be sufficient to prevent mortality.",
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N2 - Background and objective. The literature is conflicted as to whether people colonized with Staphylococcus aureus are at an increased risk of mortality. The aim of this meta-analysis was to review and analyze the current literature to determine whether prior history of S. aureus colonization is associated with mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Methods. The PUBMED databases were searched with keywords related to S. aureus colonization and mortality. After reviewing 380 article abstracts and 59 articles in detail, only 7 studies had data on the association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Crude estimates of study odds ratios (ORs) were calculated on the basis of data from subset analyses. We pooled crude ORs from the 7 studies using a random-effects model. Woolf's test for heterogeneity was assessed.results. When all studies were pooled in a random-effects model, no association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was seen (pooled OR, 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-3.66]; n = 7; heterogeneity P = .05). When the analyses were restricted to infection-attributable mortality, the association between colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was not statistically significant (pooled OR, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.15-1.21]; n = 4; heterogeneity P = .28). Conclusions. S. aureus colonization was not associated with mortality among patients who developed an S. aureus infection. Interventions to decolonize S. aureus carriers may prevent S. aureus infections but may not be sufficient to prevent mortality.

AB - Background and objective. The literature is conflicted as to whether people colonized with Staphylococcus aureus are at an increased risk of mortality. The aim of this meta-analysis was to review and analyze the current literature to determine whether prior history of S. aureus colonization is associated with mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Methods. The PUBMED databases were searched with keywords related to S. aureus colonization and mortality. After reviewing 380 article abstracts and 59 articles in detail, only 7 studies had data on the association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients. Crude estimates of study odds ratios (ORs) were calculated on the basis of data from subset analyses. We pooled crude ORs from the 7 studies using a random-effects model. Woolf's test for heterogeneity was assessed.results. When all studies were pooled in a random-effects model, no association between S. aureus colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was seen (pooled OR, 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-3.66]; n = 7; heterogeneity P = .05). When the analyses were restricted to infection-attributable mortality, the association between colonization and mortality among S. aureus-infected patients was not statistically significant (pooled OR, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.15-1.21]; n = 4; heterogeneity P = .28). Conclusions. S. aureus colonization was not associated with mortality among patients who developed an S. aureus infection. Interventions to decolonize S. aureus carriers may prevent S. aureus infections but may not be sufficient to prevent mortality.

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