State growth management programs and central-city revitalization

Casey J. Dawkins, Arthur Christian Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the latter part of the 20th century, many U.S. state governments adopted growth management programs for the purpose of establishing a more proactive role in the regulation of land use. Although many scholars have recently begun to critically examine the implementation of these new state initiatives, few have explored their effects on patterns of intraurban land development. In this article, we develop a framework for thinking about the likely effects of state growth management programs on a central city's ability to attract new residential construction activity and investigate this issue using a panel data approach. Multivariate regression results suggest that these programs have observable effects on the spatial distribution of residential construction activity within urban areas. Furthermore, we accept several hypotheses regarding coefficient stability across states, regions, and program designs. These findings suggest that state growth management programs may be an effective tool for promoting the revitalization of central cities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-395
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of the American Planning Association
Volume69
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 2003
Externally publishedYes

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management
panel data
urban area
land use
city
programme
spatial distribution
regulation
regression
ability
effect
land development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

State growth management programs and central-city revitalization. / Dawkins, Casey J.; Nelson, Arthur Christian.

In: Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 69, No. 4, 09.2003, p. 381-395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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