Strategies used by interdisciplinary rural health training programs to assure community responsiveness and recruit practitioners

Marion K. Slack, Doyle M. Cummings, Matthew E. Borrego, Kathi Fuller, Sherrie Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this article, the strategies used by five US rural interdisciplinary training grant programs to respond to local needs and to promote recruitment in rural communities are described. The programs provide training to 17 health care disciplines and serve disadvantaged Hispanic, African-American, Amish, Native American, and Anglo populations. Four programs are based in academic institutions; one is based in a community health center. The programs provide services to the rural communities through individual clinical or case management services, population-level interventions, and collaborative research. All programs use specific mechanisms (e.g. case conferences or participation in local coalitions) to facilitate collaboration with residents and to link student activities with community or individual needs. Unique strategies include the use of problem-based learning and community health workers on the interdisciplinary team to increase responsiveness. The programs also provide educational support to students while they work in the rural communities. Finally, the primary strategy used to promote recruitment is the training experience in rural communities. The programs also appear to indirectly improve the environment of rural practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-138
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 22 2002

Keywords

  • Case management
  • Community responsiveness
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Population health
  • Recruitment
  • Rural

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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