Strength of glass from Hertzian line contact

Wenrui Cai, Brian Cuerden, Robert E. Parks, James H Burge

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In optical lens assembly, metal retaining rings are often used to hold the lens in place. If we mount a lens to a sharp metal edge using normal retention force, high compressive stress is loaded to the interface and the calculated tensile stress near the contact area from Hertzian contact appears higher than allowable. Therefore, conservative designs are used to ensure that glass will not fracture during assembly and operation. We demonstrate glass survival with very high levels of stress. This paper analyzes the high contact stress between glass lenses and metal mounts using finite element model and to predict its effect on the glass strength with experimental data. We show that even though contact damage may occur under high surface tensile stress, the stress region is shallow compared to the existing flaw depth. So that glass strength will not be degraded and the component can survive subsequent applied stresses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume8125
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
EventOptomechanics 2011: Innovations and Solutions - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 22 2011Aug 25 2011

Other

OtherOptomechanics 2011: Innovations and Solutions
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/22/118/25/11

Fingerprint

Contact Line
Lenses
Glass
lenses
Lens
glass
Metals
tensile stress
Tensile stress
Contact
assembly
metals
Contact Stress
retaining
Compressive stress
Chemical elements
Finite Element Model
damage
Damage
Defects

Keywords

  • Glass lenses
  • Hertzian contact
  • Strength of glass
  • Tensile stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Cai, W., Cuerden, B., Parks, R. E., & Burge, J. H. (2011). Strength of glass from Hertzian line contact. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 8125). [81250E] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.893583

Strength of glass from Hertzian line contact. / Cai, Wenrui; Cuerden, Brian; Parks, Robert E.; Burge, James H.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8125 2011. 81250E.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Cai, W, Cuerden, B, Parks, RE & Burge, JH 2011, Strength of glass from Hertzian line contact. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 8125, 81250E, Optomechanics 2011: Innovations and Solutions, San Diego, CA, United States, 8/22/11. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.893583
Cai W, Cuerden B, Parks RE, Burge JH. Strength of glass from Hertzian line contact. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8125. 2011. 81250E https://doi.org/10.1117/12.893583
Cai, Wenrui ; Cuerden, Brian ; Parks, Robert E. ; Burge, James H. / Strength of glass from Hertzian line contact. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 8125 2011.
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