String music educators' perceptions of the impact of new string programs on student outcomes, school music programs, and communities

Robert Gillespie, Joshua A. Russell, Donald L. Hamann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of newly initiated string programs on teachers, schools, districts, communities, and existing music program administration and students. Research questions pertained to (a) locations, student access, and instructional offerings; (b) educators; and (c) perceived impact on student outcomes. Data from 64 participants were analyzed. Results indicated that new string programs were largely developed at the middle and high school levels, located in suburban (59%), urban (23%), and rural (18%) areas, with instruction held during the regular school day. The majority (86%) of teachers were credentialed string specialists. While participants cited some frustrations, such as scheduling difficulties and lack of performance facilities, they identified several benefits from the new programs, including increased student participation in all music programs, more student collaborative opportunities, increased community and local music business support, and the more comprehensive nature of the music curriculum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-187
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Research in Music Education
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Impact on music programs
  • New string programs
  • School string programs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Music

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