Student Participation in Collective Problem Solving in an After-School Mathematics Club: Connections to Learning and Identity

Erin E Turner, Rodrigo J. Gutiérrez, Taliesin Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the participation of a group of middle school students in an after-school mathematics club as they worked on cryptography problems. The analysis focused on interactions characterized by collective problem-solving activity, when intellectual work was distributed and various students took on active problem-solving roles, paying particular attention to intersections between task structures and positioning moves. We found that all open-ended tasks-those tasks that afforded multiple strategies and had multiple solutions-resulted in at least some collective problem solving, though it was not always sustained (Turner, Gutiérrez, & Sutton, 2009). We also found that the task structures, in combination with interactive positioning moves by facilitators and students, served to sustain or disrupt collective problem-solving activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-246
Number of pages21
JournalCanadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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  • Education

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Student Participation in Collective Problem Solving in an After-School Mathematics Club : Connections to Learning and Identity. / Turner, Erin E; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo J.; Sutton, Taliesin.

In: Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, Vol. 11, No. 3, 07.2011, p. 226-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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