Subsidence, stress regime and rotation(s) of a tectonically active sedimentary basin within the western Alpine Orogen: The Tertiary Piedmont Basin (Alpine domain, NW Italy)

B. Carrapa, G. Bertotti, W. Krijgsman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Oligocene to Miocene Tertiary Piedmont Basin (TPB) is located in the NW part of Italy at the junction between the Apennine and the Alpine thrust belts. The position of the TPB on top of the Alpine/Apennine Orogen poses fundamental questions as to the tectonics of the basin subsidence. Having undergone little deformation, the TPB sediments provide an insight into the stress regime and rotations in the kinematically very complex area surrounding the basin itself. In this study we integrate subsidence and structural analysis with measurements of magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (AMS) and natural remanent magnetization (NRM) in order to better constrain the tectonic kinematics of the basin evolution. A major important period of subsidence occured in the Middle Miocene involving the whole basin. During this period the TPB experienced NE-SW-directed compression and limited shortening. Some NW-SE-directed compressional features have been identified and they were probably active during post Tortonian times. Structures associated with north-south tension are quite common, but the amount of strain that they accomodate is minor. In addition this research provides new preliminary data suggesting counterclockwise rotation in the TPB by c. 20° which has taken place during Middle Miocene time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-227
Number of pages23
JournalGeological Society Special Publication
Volume208
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Geology

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