Successful Goal-Directed Memory Suppression is Associated With Increased Inter-Hemispheric Coordination Between Right and Left Frontoparietal Control Networks

Ryan Smith, Anna Alkozei, Jennifer Bao, William Killgore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The neural basis of suppressing conscious access to one’s own memories has recently received considerable attention, with several studies suggesting this process engages frontal-parietal cognitive control regions. However, researchers to date have not examined the way right and left hemisphere cognitive control networks coordinate with one another to accomplish this. We had 48 participants (25 female) complete a Think/No Think (T/NT) task for memories of emotionally unpleasant visual scenes while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used generalized psychophysiologic interaction analyses to examine functional connectivity between right and left hemisphere frontal-parietal regions during memory suppression. Participants who were better at memory suppression, as assessed by greater numbers of forgotten memories in the NT than T conditions, also showed greater functional connectivity between multiple right and left hemisphere control regions. This suggests that individual differences in memory suppression ability may be partially explained by differences in task-specific inter-hemispheric coordination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-111
Number of pages19
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume121
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Parietal Lobe
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Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
  • emotion
  • inferior parietal cortex
  • precuneus
  • Retrieval suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Successful Goal-Directed Memory Suppression is Associated With Increased Inter-Hemispheric Coordination Between Right and Left Frontoparietal Control Networks. / Smith, Ryan; Alkozei, Anna; Bao, Jennifer; Killgore, William.

In: Psychological Reports, Vol. 121, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 93-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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