Successional stage after land abandonment modulates fire severity and post-fire recovery in a Mediterranean mountain landscape

Rosario López-Poma, Barron J Orr, Susana Bautista

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study analyses the effect of successional stage after farmland terrace abandonment on post-fire plant recovery in a Mediterranean landscape. Specific objectives of the study were to (1) compare fuel characteristics and fire severity in three successional stages after farmland abandonment - dry grassland, dense shrubland and pine stands; (2) analyse the effect of pre-fire successional stage and fire severity on vegetation recovery and (3) analyse the relative vulnerability (i.e. potential for ecosystem shift and soil degradation) to wildfires of the successional stages. We assessed 30 abandoned terraces (15 unburned and 15 burned), with diverse successional stages, on the Xortà Range (south-east Spain). Post-fire recovery was measured 1, 4 and 7 years after fire. The successional stages varied in aboveground biomass, litter amount, vertical structure and continuity of plant cover, and flammability. Dry grassland showed the lowest fire severity, whereas no differences in severity were found between shrubland and pine stands. One year after fire, plant cover was inversely related to fire severity; this relationship attenuated with time after fire. Post-fire recovery of pine stands and shrubland led in both cases to shrublands, contributing to landscape homogenisation. The pine stands showed the largest changes in composition due to fire and the lowest post-fire plant recovery - a sign of high vulnerability to fire.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1005-1015
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Wildland Fire
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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fire severity
mountains
mountain
shrublands
Pinus
shrubland
terraces
ground cover plants
agricultural land
grasslands
land
flammability
terrace
vulnerability
soil degradation
grassland
homogenization
wildfires
aboveground biomass
Spain

Keywords

  • abandoned terraces ecosystem vulnerability
  • Brachypodium retusum
  • Pinus halepensis
  • post-fire regeneration
  • resprouter
  • seeder
  • Ulex parviflorus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Ecology

Cite this

Successional stage after land abandonment modulates fire severity and post-fire recovery in a Mediterranean mountain landscape. / López-Poma, Rosario; Orr, Barron J; Bautista, Susana.

In: International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 23, No. 7, 2014, p. 1005-1015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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