Superior vena cava syndrome: Treatment with catheter-directed thrombolysis and endovascular stent placement

Stephen T. Kee, Lisa Kinoshita, Mahmood K. Razavi, Ulf R.O. Nyman, Charles P. Semba, Michael D. Dake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate use of catheter-directed thrombolysis and/or endovascular stent placement to treat superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-nine consecutive patients with SVC syndrome were studied. The cause was underlying malignancy in 43 and benign disease in 16. All patients underwent bilateral upper-extremity venography. The SVC was occluded in 31 cases and stenosed in 28. Twenty-seven patients underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis; 51 underwent endovascular stent placement. Patency was defined in terms of absence of symptoms and signs of SVC syndrome. RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in 56 of 59 patients (95%). Among 42 patients with underlying malignancy (mean follow-up, 7.0 months; range, 1-34 months), primary clinical patency was achieved in 33 (79%) and secondary clinical patency was achieved in 39 (93%). Among 13 patients with benign disease (mean follow-up, 17.0 months; range, 1-27 months), primary clinical patency was achieved in 10 (77%) and secondary clinical patency was achieved in 11 (85%). Four patients were lost to follow-up. Periprocedural mortality and morbidity rates were 3% (two of 59 patients) and 10% (six of 59 patients), respectively. CONCLUSION: Catheter-directed thrombolysis and endovascular stent placement is a safe and effective treatment for SVC syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-193
Number of pages7
JournalRadiology
Volume206
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome
Stents
Catheters
Therapeutics
Superior Vena Cava
Phlebography
Lost to Follow-Up
Upper Extremity
Signs and Symptoms
Neoplasms
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Venae cavae, grafts and prostheses
  • Venae cavae, interventional procedure
  • Venae cavae, stenosis or obstruction
  • Venae cavae, thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Superior vena cava syndrome : Treatment with catheter-directed thrombolysis and endovascular stent placement. / Kee, Stephen T.; Kinoshita, Lisa; Razavi, Mahmood K.; Nyman, Ulf R.O.; Semba, Charles P.; Dake, Michael D.

In: Radiology, Vol. 206, No. 1, 01.1998, p. 187-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kee, Stephen T. ; Kinoshita, Lisa ; Razavi, Mahmood K. ; Nyman, Ulf R.O. ; Semba, Charles P. ; Dake, Michael D. / Superior vena cava syndrome : Treatment with catheter-directed thrombolysis and endovascular stent placement. In: Radiology. 1998 ; Vol. 206, No. 1. pp. 187-193.
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