Supporting Students in General Education Classrooms

Shirin D Antia, Kathryn H. Kreimeyer, Susanne Reed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A high percentage of children and youth who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) currently receive much of their instruction in general education classrooms with support from itinerant teachers. With the widespread use of early newborn hearing screening and access to early intervention, increasing numbers of DHH children are expected to be educated in general education classrooms, integrated with their hearing peers. The purpose of this chapter is to review the academic and social status of DHH students in general education classrooms, examine the factors that contribute to their success, and develop a framework for the kinds of support that they need from itinerant teachers. A review of the academic status and progress of DHH students in general education classrooms reveals that they achieve at a higher level and make more academic progress than that reported for the general population of DHH students. However, they may not perform academically as well as hearing students. The data on social behavior are scarce and the results are mixed. Nevertheless, recent research indicates that these students are not lacking in social competence, and may be as liked as their hearing peers. Based on the research on factors contributing to the success of these DHH students, we describe a framework for the kinds of support that itinerant teachers should provide in the areas of communication and literacy, learning strategies, self-advocacy, classroom participation, and social skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education
PublisherOxford University Press
Volume2
ISBN (Print)9780199940288, 9780195390032
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2012

Fingerprint

Hearing
Students
Education
Social Behavior
Research
Communication
Learning
Newborn Infant
Population

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Academic progress
  • Deaf and hard-of-hearing students
  • General education classrooms
  • Itinerant teachers
  • Public schools
  • Social behavior
  • Social integration
  • Support services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Antia, S. D., Kreimeyer, K. H., & Reed, S. (2012). Supporting Students in General Education Classrooms. In The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education (Vol. 2). Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195390032.013.0006

Supporting Students in General Education Classrooms. / Antia, Shirin D; Kreimeyer, Kathryn H.; Reed, Susanne.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education. Vol. 2 Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Antia, SD, Kreimeyer, KH & Reed, S 2012, Supporting Students in General Education Classrooms. in The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education. vol. 2, Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195390032.013.0006
Antia SD, Kreimeyer KH, Reed S. Supporting Students in General Education Classrooms. In The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education. Vol. 2. Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195390032.013.0006
Antia, Shirin D ; Kreimeyer, Kathryn H. ; Reed, Susanne. / Supporting Students in General Education Classrooms. The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education. Vol. 2 Oxford University Press, 2012.
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