Surgical Equipment Price Awareness Amongst Obstetrician-Gynecologists

Kayvahn P. Steck-Bayat, Janet A Foote, Jamal Mourad, Kelly H. Roy, Andrea G. Aguirre, Nichole D. Mahnert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Physicians typically have little information of surgical device pricing, although this trend has not been studied in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. We therefore aimed to determine how accurately obstetrician-gynecologists estimate surgical device prices, and to identify factors associated with accuracy. Methods: An anonymous survey was emailed to all obstetrician-gynecologist attendings, fellows, and residents at 3 teaching hospitals in a single healthcare system in Arizona. We obtained demographic data, perceptions of price transparency and self-rated price knowledge, and price estimates for 31 surgical devices. Results: After participants provided consent and demographics, they then estimated the purchasing price of 31 devices. We defined price accuracy as being within ±10% of the hospital's purchasing price. Fifty-six of the 170 (32.9%) invitees completed the survey and 48 (28.2%) provided price estimates. On average, participants identified 1.9 items correctly (6.1%; range, 0-7 items) out of 31 with no difference in accuracy based on seniority, surgical volume, physician reimbursement structure, nor subspecialty practice-focus. All (100%) respondents felt pricing should be transparent, and only 1.8% felt it is at least somewhat transparent. Conclusion: We found that price-estimate accuracy was very low and had no association with any of the demographics. Also notable was the perception that pricing is not transparent despite a unanimous desire for transparency. Although physicians reported a preference for using less-expensive surgical devices, we conclude that physicians are unequipped to make cost-conscious decisions highlighting a large potential for education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Surgical Equipment
Equipment and Supplies
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis
Demography
Hospital Purchasings
Gynecology
Teaching Hospitals
Obstetrics

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Education
  • Price
  • Surgery
  • Transparency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgical Equipment Price Awareness Amongst Obstetrician-Gynecologists. / Steck-Bayat, Kayvahn P.; Foote, Janet A; Mourad, Jamal; Roy, Kelly H.; Aguirre, Andrea G.; Mahnert, Nichole D.

In: JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steck-Bayat, Kayvahn P. ; Foote, Janet A ; Mourad, Jamal ; Roy, Kelly H. ; Aguirre, Andrea G. ; Mahnert, Nichole D. / Surgical Equipment Price Awareness Amongst Obstetrician-Gynecologists. In: JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 2.
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